Panang Curry and BOMB Number 129 Fall 2014
You’ve seen this before and you see it again because I heart Panang Curry. This is leftover from dinner at one of my fave restaurants, Yupha’s, and I just add lots of additional veg to make the delicious sauce stretch for a few more meals. It’s a great lunch to go with a first review of a mag I’ve been wanting to read.
I can’t tell you how impressed I am with BOMB just as an artifact. How can they afford so many glossy color pages!? Lots of ads, for sure, but some of the ads look like art too so I’m not even mad. I need to say first—Nicole Cherubini, I WANT. Especially Poseidon’s Sister, a gorgeous earthenware piece and Earth Pot #3. I think if I had those pieces in my home and could look at them every day I would be a better human being.
I love the interview with Claudia Rankine. It starts from a sincere place and blossoms into a very smart conversation. I feel happy to get to sit in on it.
What a satisfying read, BOMB. Thanks for all that you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Panang Curry and BOMB Number 129 Fall 2014

You’ve seen this before and you see it again because I heart Panang Curry. This is leftover from dinner at one of my fave restaurants, Yupha’s, and I just add lots of additional veg to make the delicious sauce stretch for a few more meals. It’s a great lunch to go with a first review of a mag I’ve been wanting to read.

I can’t tell you how impressed I am with BOMB just as an artifact. How can they afford so many glossy color pages!? Lots of ads, for sure, but some of the ads look like art too so I’m not even mad. I need to say first—Nicole Cherubini, I WANT. Especially Poseidon’s Sister, a gorgeous earthenware piece and Earth Pot #3. I think if I had those pieces in my home and could look at them every day I would be a better human being.

I love the interview with Claudia Rankine. It starts from a sincere place and blossoms into a very smart conversation. I feel happy to get to sit in on it.

What a satisfying read, BOMB. Thanks for all that you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Zucchini Pasta and The Journal Summer 2014
Wow I really love my spiralschneider.  It makes such a delicious “pasta” dish out of fresh zucchini. This is so super easy to make: just twirl away, add sauce (and cheese if you like) and you feel like you’re eating some spags in moments. But with more vitamins!
I can barely believe it but it’s true. This is my first time lunching with The Journal. I have been lunching once a week for two years with various lit mags. How have I missed this classic?
I want to say that I love this art by Gabrielle Barouch. I think my favorite piece is “Migration,” which is also featured on the website. Looking back at their archives, I see that they really enjoy publishing illustrations.
So let’s dig in to the issue! It’s super poetry heavy (with only 3 stories and 1 essay) and I do see some of my faves: Adam Tavel, Shane McCrae, Gary L. McDowell. I’m also happy to see a review of domina/un-blued by Ruth Ellen Kocher—she just won the Pen Open Book Award for this beautiful and compelling book.
Some of my favorite poems here are “When the heart stalls” by Anne Marie Rooney: “You sit in the soup of feel and your good/ Muscle starts to hurt.” Also so strong is “Barnyard door” by Kristin Robertson. “I balled up in the shower stall/ and whispered my strange hosanna.”
What a lovely issue, The Journal. I can’t wait to read more!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Zucchini Pasta and The Journal Summer 2014

Wow I really love my spiralschneider. It makes such a delicious “pasta” dish out of fresh zucchini. This is so super easy to make: just twirl away, add sauce (and cheese if you like) and you feel like you’re eating some spags in moments. But with more vitamins!

I can barely believe it but it’s true. This is my first time lunching with The Journal. I have been lunching once a week for two years with various lit mags. How have I missed this classic?

I want to say that I love this art by Gabrielle Barouch. I think my favorite piece is “Migration,” which is also featured on the website. Looking back at their archives, I see that they really enjoy publishing illustrations.

So let’s dig in to the issue! It’s super poetry heavy (with only 3 stories and 1 essay) and I do see some of my faves: Adam Tavel, Shane McCrae, Gary L. McDowell. I’m also happy to see a review of domina/un-blued by Ruth Ellen Kocher—she just won the Pen Open Book Award for this beautiful and compelling book.

Some of my favorite poems here are “When the heart stalls” by Anne Marie Rooney: “You sit in the soup of feel and your good/ Muscle starts to hurt.” Also so strong is “Barnyard door” by Kristin Robertson. “I balled up in the shower stall/ and whispered my strange hosanna.”

What a lovely issue, The Journal. I can’t wait to read more!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Sweet Potato Gnocchi and Slice Magazine Fall14/Winter 15 Issue 15
This picture might be misleading. Doesn’t it look like yam covered with tomato and Parmesan? Well, it’s really Sweet Potato Gnocchi covered with tomato and Parmesan. This is a really filling and delicious meal. I like how the tomato brightens up the dish.
Let me tell you a secret about reading Slice today. I have this friend who is a terrifically brilliant poet. In my opinion, he should have 7+ books out, 20+ awards, 50+ speaking engagements, 5+ teaching posts, and mad respect from the poetry world. He’s going to be discovered any day now and be the next big thing. I really feel that editors just haven’t “gotten” him yet.
But guess what? Slice got him. And here he is! Pete Miller on Page 107. His poem “Lucifer at 40” is from a series of “Folks at 40” poems that are irreverent, inventive, and innovative. I’ll just a quote a few lines that I can’t get out of my head: “It’s like trying to savor embers,” and “to set the baked ham back to ovulating before the Easter guests” and “His real curse is never seeing the moon as beautiful again.”
I want this manuscript to be published. Pete, congrats on appearing here, and I hope to have many more lunches with lit mags that are publishing your work.
What a treat, too, to see a poem by Ron Carlson as well, “Party at the Beach Party House.” I’ve been a long-time fan of his fiction. I’m really looking forward to his book The Blue Box, a collection of flash and poetry, coming out of Red Hen.
And I’m always so happy to read Kelle Groom.”Under the Washington Street Church” is stunning.
Really nice collection of work here Slice!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Sweet Potato Gnocchi and Slice Magazine Fall14/Winter 15 Issue 15

This picture might be misleading. Doesn’t it look like yam covered with tomato and Parmesan? Well, it’s really Sweet Potato Gnocchi covered with tomato and Parmesan. This is a really filling and delicious meal. I like how the tomato brightens up the dish.

Let me tell you a secret about reading Slice today. I have this friend who is a terrifically brilliant poet. In my opinion, he should have 7+ books out, 20+ awards, 50+ speaking engagements, 5+ teaching posts, and mad respect from the poetry world. He’s going to be discovered any day now and be the next big thing. I really feel that editors just haven’t “gotten” him yet.

But guess what? Slice got him. And here he is! Pete Miller on Page 107. His poem “Lucifer at 40” is from a series of “Folks at 40” poems that are irreverent, inventive, and innovative. I’ll just a quote a few lines that I can’t get out of my head: “It’s like trying to savor embers,” and “to set the baked ham back to ovulating before the Easter guests” and “His real curse is never seeing the moon as beautiful again.”

I want this manuscript to be published. Pete, congrats on appearing here, and I hope to have many more lunches with lit mags that are publishing your work.

What a treat, too, to see a poem by Ron Carlson as well, “Party at the Beach Party House.” I’ve been a long-time fan of his fiction. I’m really looking forward to his book The Blue Box, a collection of flash and poetry, coming out of Red Hen.

And I’m always so happy to read Kelle Groom.”Under the Washington Street Church” is stunning.

Really nice collection of work here Slice!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Eggplant Parm and Natural Bridge No. 31 Spring 2014
Do you have a favorite neighborhood haunt? I do. It’s Nello’s, a pizzeria a mile away that serves delicious wood-fired pizza, fresh pasta, and inventive salads. We are, well, well-known there. I would say we go once a week when we’re in town for a stretch. This lunch is left over from last night’s eggplant parm, and it’s so, so very delicious. The housemade tomato sauce is really flavorful.
I am very happy to be reading Natural Bridge today, especially since I’ve always wanted to publish in it, and look at that! I have a poem here. I was so pleased that my poem “Perennial” was picked up for this issue. And it’s in good company.
Two short notes before I start: I really like the idea of “Editor’s Advertisements” up front, where the editors talk about their top pieces. I have my editors do this too, though I have them share that information at our launch party. Maybe for Issue 14 of SR I’ll add that to the Editor’s Note. I also enjoyed the “News from Our Authors” section. That’s a great idea too. We usually push that news to our social networks, but it’s nice to see it all in one place.
So let me talk about some of my favorite bits. I liked Simon Perchik’s “*,” especially the line “as if going somewhere was still possible.” I published him in Issue 5 of Superstition Review and recently had occasion to look closely at those poems and was as happy with them the second time as I was the first!
I also enjoyed “Pie” by Leslie Johnson.
Thanks so much for including my work, Natural Bridge. I’m honored!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.

Eggplant Parm and Natural Bridge No. 31 Spring 2014

Do you have a favorite neighborhood haunt? I do. It’s Nello’s, a pizzeria a mile away that serves delicious wood-fired pizza, fresh pasta, and inventive salads. We are, well, well-known there. I would say we go once a week when we’re in town for a stretch. This lunch is left over from last night’s eggplant parm, and it’s so, so very delicious. The housemade tomato sauce is really flavorful.

I am very happy to be reading Natural Bridge today, especially since I’ve always wanted to publish in it, and look at that! I have a poem here. I was so pleased that my poem “Perennial” was picked up for this issue. And it’s in good company.

Two short notes before I start: I really like the idea of “Editor’s Advertisements” up front, where the editors talk about their top pieces. I have my editors do this too, though I have them share that information at our launch party. Maybe for Issue 14 of SR I’ll add that to the Editor’s Note. I also enjoyed the “News from Our Authors” section. That’s a great idea too. We usually push that news to our social networks, but it’s nice to see it all in one place.

So let me talk about some of my favorite bits. I liked Simon Perchik’s “*,” especially the line “as if going somewhere was still possible.” I published him in Issue 5 of Superstition Review and recently had occasion to look closely at those poems and was as happy with them the second time as I was the first!

I also enjoyed “Pie” by Leslie Johnson.

Thanks so much for including my work, Natural Bridge. I’m honored!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

Four Square and The Cincinnati Review 10.2
I’ve been stepping away from my full-vegan press and adding a few foods like fish and chicken and cheese. Part of this is simply laziness since I find it easier to prepare these foods. Part of it is I am ramping up my training since I have three races in November and I feel more satisfied when I eat more than simply fruit and veg. So here’s a little plate I’ll call “Four Square” for its simplicity. Roasted potatoes, corn, tomatoes, and wild Alaskan salmon. This meal screams summer to me and it is satisfying and yum.
I am very happy to be reading The Cincinnati Review today. I’m from Cincinnati, and though I don’t really know many folks over at the UC writing program, I still have a soft spot in my heart for the City of Seven Hills. So I’m looking forward to digging in.
Before I do, just a note about the “The.” So, here we get a big fat prominent “The” on the cover of the magazine. But it’s missing from the website URL, the Facebook name, and the Twitter handle. I mention this only because I was very specific that there is no “The” in Superstition Review, so when I see past contributors add “The” as part of our title I die for about five seconds and then I move on to other disappointments.
Perhaps my sticklerism comes because my first two poetry publications were in The Iowa Review and Indiana Review. I still remember the admonitions from both editors to keep it straight. So now I’m interested about that choice, either way, and the level of attention contributors pay to it. I always think of adding some language about it in our acceptance but then maybe people would think I’m inflexible. Ha!
On to the TOC. Holy poets batman! Okay we get 6 stories, 3 essays, and 40 poets. That’s a lot of work! I publish 10 artists, 10 stories, 10 essays, 10 interviews, and 20 poets and it’s so much to curate! Reading, voting, agreeing, accepting, declining, gathering, building, proofing, etc. Poets are not an easy bunch to wrangle. So good on you, The Cincinnati Review, for all your great work here.
I loved “Animals Invaluable to Epidemiologists for Tracking the Spread of Disease Will Appear to Us as Angels” by Daneen Bergland, especially the line, “If you’ve never been full of eggs, you wouldn’t understand.” Also, the Colleen Abel, “Caryatid,” “Nothing in the pumice but ghost.” I published her in the spring in Superstition Review. 
I really enjoyed it, The Cincinnati Review. Keep up the great work!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Four Square and The Cincinnati Review 10.2

I’ve been stepping away from my full-vegan press and adding a few foods like fish and chicken and cheese. Part of this is simply laziness since I find it easier to prepare these foods. Part of it is I am ramping up my training since I have three races in November and I feel more satisfied when I eat more than simply fruit and veg. So here’s a little plate I’ll call “Four Square” for its simplicity. Roasted potatoes, corn, tomatoes, and wild Alaskan salmon. This meal screams summer to me and it is satisfying and yum.

I am very happy to be reading The Cincinnati Review today. I’m from Cincinnati, and though I don’t really know many folks over at the UC writing program, I still have a soft spot in my heart for the City of Seven Hills. So I’m looking forward to digging in.

Before I do, just a note about the “The.” So, here we get a big fat prominent “The” on the cover of the magazine. But it’s missing from the website URL, the Facebook name, and the Twitter handle. I mention this only because I was very specific that there is no “The” in Superstition Review, so when I see past contributors add “The” as part of our title I die for about five seconds and then I move on to other disappointments.

Perhaps my sticklerism comes because my first two poetry publications were in The Iowa Review and Indiana Review. I still remember the admonitions from both editors to keep it straight. So now I’m interested about that choice, either way, and the level of attention contributors pay to it. I always think of adding some language about it in our acceptance but then maybe people would think I’m inflexible. Ha!

On to the TOC. Holy poets batman! Okay we get 6 stories, 3 essays, and 40 poets. That’s a lot of work! I publish 10 artists, 10 stories, 10 essays, 10 interviews, and 20 poets and it’s so much to curate! Reading, voting, agreeing, accepting, declining, gathering, building, proofing, etc. Poets are not an easy bunch to wrangle. So good on you, The Cincinnati Review, for all your great work here.

I loved “Animals Invaluable to Epidemiologists for Tracking the Spread of Disease Will Appear to Us as Angels” by Daneen Bergland, especially the line, “If you’ve never been full of eggs, you wouldn’t understand.” Also, the Colleen Abel, “Caryatid,” “Nothing in the pumice but ghost.” I published her in the spring in Superstition Review.

I really enjoyed it, The Cincinnati Review. Keep up the great work!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

AWP Breakfast and Mississippi Review 42.1 & 2
I was so hungry today I started eating before I snapped the picture. Note the bite out of the toast. I love AWP Breakfast at AWP and at home for lunch too. This is delicious and easy to make.
Wow somebody likes couplets! I do too. There are a lot of very prim and proper poems here (shape-wise). Harold Whit Williams’ poem “Blues Dreams” has some really impressive musicality. “Slide scraped along taut catgut strings.” And “Flaccid, drunk upon scuffed hardwoods.” Some really strong writing. I also like Rebecca Zweig’s “Pipelines.”
In the fiction section Kristin Valdez Quade’s handling of a child protagonist was artful—it’s not easy to do.
What a fun read, Mississippi Review. Thanks for all that you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

AWP Breakfast and Mississippi Review 42.1 & 2

I was so hungry today I started eating before I snapped the picture. Note the bite out of the toast. I love AWP Breakfast at AWP and at home for lunch too. This is delicious and easy to make.

Wow somebody likes couplets! I do too. There are a lot of very prim and proper poems here (shape-wise). Harold Whit Williams’ poem “Blues Dreams” has some really impressive musicality. “Slide scraped along taut catgut strings.” And “Flaccid, drunk upon scuffed hardwoods.” Some really strong writing. I also like Rebecca Zweig’s “Pipelines.”

In the fiction section Kristin Valdez Quade’s handling of a child protagonist was artful—it’s not easy to do.

What a fun read, Mississippi Review. Thanks for all that you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

MIdwestern Mom and Sycamore Review 25.1 Fall/Winter 2013.
I’m calling this the Midwestern Mom because it’s the kind of lunch my Midwestern Mom used to make. Green beans, yams, and chicken. I have a bit of a rebellious streak, thus the Sriracha sauce. Oh she would have flipped her Midwestern lid over that.
I am very happy to come back to Sycamore Review. I reviewed one of their issues last year and really enjoyed it. It’s pretty cool how they do the larger format so they can do double columns. It was fun to see that Dallas Woodburn is the fiction editor—I published one of her pieces in the last issue of Superstition Review. 
So on I go to the TOC. Holy poets batman! Rusty Morrison—love her book After Urgency. I have to say she has been a huge influence on my aesthetic recently. I used to be a fan of more narrative work but her surprises with every line leave me craving more lyrical turns. Here I love, “The asthma angel tonight is transitory.”
Dear Norman Dubie—one of my MFA mentors and now a colleague. Gorgeous. “The madder lake. The little pots of breast milk.” They are short and meditative and beautiful.
And in Nonfiction is Jesse Goolsby, who I published in issue 10 of Superstition Review.
Great work with this issue, Sycamore Review. I enjoyed our lunch!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

MIdwestern Mom and Sycamore Review 25.1 Fall/Winter 2013.

I’m calling this the Midwestern Mom because it’s the kind of lunch my Midwestern Mom used to make. Green beans, yams, and chicken. I have a bit of a rebellious streak, thus the Sriracha sauce. Oh she would have flipped her Midwestern lid over that.

I am very happy to come back to Sycamore Review. I reviewed one of their issues last year and really enjoyed it. It’s pretty cool how they do the larger format so they can do double columns. It was fun to see that Dallas Woodburn is the fiction editor—I published one of her pieces in the last issue of Superstition Review.

So on I go to the TOC. Holy poets batman! Rusty Morrison—love her book After Urgency. I have to say she has been a huge influence on my aesthetic recently. I used to be a fan of more narrative work but her surprises with every line leave me craving more lyrical turns. Here I love, “The asthma angel tonight is transitory.”

Dear Norman Dubie—one of my MFA mentors and now a colleague. Gorgeous. “The madder lake. The little pots of breast milk.” They are short and meditative and beautiful.

And in Nonfiction is Jesse Goolsby, who I published in issue 10 of Superstition Review.

Great work with this issue, Sycamore Review. I enjoyed our lunch!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Gnocchi and Pleiades 34.2 Summer 2014.
We got this gnocchi pre-made at Trader Joe’s and boy is it filling! I just add some sauce and lots of veggies and there’s dinner. I usually have some left over for an easy lunch.
I am going to make an admission about Pleiades. Trying to spell it might be the end of me. So many vowels!
But the good news is that it’s such a great journal and I really love reading it. Like here, the quote on the back by Carmen Gimenez-Smith. So striking. Makes me want to dig in.
What a huge book review section! That’s interesting. I’m also struck by the trend of taking only one poem from most poets. I used to really like to publish big suites of poems in SR, but lately I’ve been leaning more towards taking only one or two—unless the submission is curated so carefully that the suite does more work as a whole. Anyhow, I also think about this more as I’m putting together my own submissions for magazines.
But on to the work—Mark Halliday’s essay on the fun of being a poet is quite a romp. I enjoyed the line, “The poet’s vocation often induces anxiety, yes, but the anxiety is part of an adventure not to be missed.” I really enjoyed C. Dylan Bassett’s “October Physics,” especially the passage: “I walked through the garden unapologetically. Correction: I was the garden and it was painful to be a body of land.” Lots of great writing here.
What a lovely issue, Pleiades. I can’t wait to read more!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Gnocchi and Pleiades 34.2 Summer 2014.

We got this gnocchi pre-made at Trader Joe’s and boy is it filling! I just add some sauce and lots of veggies and there’s dinner. I usually have some left over for an easy lunch.

I am going to make an admission about Pleiades. Trying to spell it might be the end of me. So many vowels!

But the good news is that it’s such a great journal and I really love reading it. Like here, the quote on the back by Carmen Gimenez-Smith. So striking. Makes me want to dig in.

What a huge book review section! That’s interesting. I’m also struck by the trend of taking only one poem from most poets. I used to really like to publish big suites of poems in SR, but lately I’ve been leaning more towards taking only one or two—unless the submission is curated so carefully that the suite does more work as a whole. Anyhow, I also think about this more as I’m putting together my own submissions for magazines.

But on to the work—Mark Halliday’s essay on the fun of being a poet is quite a romp. I enjoyed the line, “The poet’s vocation often induces anxiety, yes, but the anxiety is part of an adventure not to be missed.” I really enjoyed C. Dylan Bassett’s “October Physics,” especially the passage: “I walked through the garden unapologetically. Correction: I was the garden and it was painful to be a body of land.” Lots of great writing here.

What a lovely issue, Pleiades. I can’t wait to read more!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Egg Taco and Spoon River Poetry Review 39.1 Summer 2014.
Does this egg taco look gross? I’m afraid it does. But it was so decadent and delicious and tasty. It leaked egg and salsa all over the table. And I loved every minute of it. And I’ll eat another soon.
I was so happy to get this issue of Spoon River Poetry Review! I met Kirstin Hotelling Zona at AWP one year when she had just become editor so I’ve been anxious to follow the magazine. This issue was guest edited while she was on sabbatical so I’ll need to wait for another issue to see her touches. So what of this one?
I love the cover art. It goes very well with my egg taco. I also like the simple font and design here. I’m looking over the TOC and I do not recognize one name. That’s not a bad thing, just a rare thing since I read so many lit mags and I also edit one and see lots of submissions. In reading the contributors notes I see that many of these poets are MFA students or new grads or have 1-2 books out with small independent or university presses. It’s a nice representation and I’m happy that SRPR is showcasing this work.
I’m interested here in the currents of place: outdoor space and rivers and sun and clouds—and also trauma: rape, abuse, death, violence, unsteadiness. The diverse voices become a chorus.
I really enjoyed it, Spoon River Poetry Review. Keep up the great work!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Egg Taco and Spoon River Poetry Review 39.1 Summer 2014.

Does this egg taco look gross? I’m afraid it does. But it was so decadent and delicious and tasty. It leaked egg and salsa all over the table. And I loved every minute of it. And I’ll eat another soon.

I was so happy to get this issue of Spoon River Poetry Review! I met Kirstin Hotelling Zona at AWP one year when she had just become editor so I’ve been anxious to follow the magazine. This issue was guest edited while she was on sabbatical so I’ll need to wait for another issue to see her touches. So what of this one?

I love the cover art. It goes very well with my egg taco. I also like the simple font and design here. I’m looking over the TOC and I do not recognize one name. That’s not a bad thing, just a rare thing since I read so many lit mags and I also edit one and see lots of submissions. In reading the contributors notes I see that many of these poets are MFA students or new grads or have 1-2 books out with small independent or university presses. It’s a nice representation and I’m happy that SRPR is showcasing this work.

I’m interested here in the currents of place: outdoor space and rivers and sun and clouds—and also trauma: rape, abuse, death, violence, unsteadiness. The diverse voices become a chorus.

I really enjoyed it, Spoon River Poetry Review. Keep up the great work!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Panang Curry and Burnside Review Volume 10 Number 1
You know all about my weakness for curry. See this picture? Yes that’s why. This comes from one of my favorite Thai restaurants, Thai Basil. I order the Panang with Tofu and eat it 4 times by adding lots more fresh veggies. See that asparagus? Delightful!
Something else delightful is this issue of Burnside Review! So I was walking the AWP Bookfair in Seattle when I passed the Burnside table. They had accepted one of my poems but it was recent so I had not imagined it was out yet. I picked up the current issue—love the unique shape and understated design—and noticed some great contributors—Kyle McCord, Ralph Angel, Mark Neely, Farrah Field. And then I saw my name too! How cool.
I really enjoyed reading this. Loved the Ralph Angel line, “When you were a fish/you were a salmon.” And Stephanie Ellis Schlaifer’s “We think ourselves a wall of water.”
Thanks so much for including my work, Burnside Review. I’m honored!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.

Panang Curry and Burnside Review Volume 10 Number 1

You know all about my weakness for curry. See this picture? Yes that’s why. This comes from one of my favorite Thai restaurants, Thai Basil. I order the Panang with Tofu and eat it 4 times by adding lots more fresh veggies. See that asparagus? Delightful!

Something else delightful is this issue of Burnside Review! So I was walking the AWP Bookfair in Seattle when I passed the Burnside table. They had accepted one of my poems but it was recent so I had not imagined it was out yet. I picked up the current issue—love the unique shape and understated design—and noticed some great contributors—Kyle McCord, Ralph Angel, Mark Neely, Farrah Field. And then I saw my name too! How cool.

I really enjoyed reading this. Loved the Ralph Angel line, “When you were a fish/you were a salmon.” And Stephanie Ellis Schlaifer’s “We think ourselves a wall of water.”

Thanks so much for including my work, Burnside Review. I’m honored!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

Enchilada Casserole and Cardinal Sins Fall 2013
I’ve made it before and I’ll make it again! We had a huge taco party at the house, and sure enough we had tons of leftovers: tortillas, beans, tomatoes, onions. That’s how we knew it was time for Enchilada casserole! I love building this out like a lasagna in a 9x11 pan. Life hack: cut the tortillas in half and line the flat edge up against the pan edge. What a delicious meal times about 9, since it’s so filling we ate off this pan for days.
I am guessing I picked up this copy of Cardinal Sins at AWP. So they are run by undergrads at Saginaw Valley State University. Says here they have been publishing for 30 years! Wow. The school must love them. I’ve been publishing SR for 7 years now (coming up on Issue 14) and we have wonderful support at ASU as well, and it’s so great to hear that other universities believe in supporting the arts this way.
So I’ll say first I didn’t recognize any of these contributors, which makes me wonder if they are also undergrads? I think they might be, since I’m looking at the contributors page and we have a lot of cheeky bios such as “X will be a thorn in your side,” and “X is surreal.” So. Yeah.
I enjoyed the large art section. Some compelling pieces such as Agoraphobia by Erin Case
What a fun read, Cardinal Sins. Thanks for all that you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Enchilada Casserole and Cardinal Sins Fall 2013

I’ve made it before and I’ll make it again! We had a huge taco party at the house, and sure enough we had tons of leftovers: tortillas, beans, tomatoes, onions. That’s how we knew it was time for Enchilada casserole! I love building this out like a lasagna in a 9x11 pan. Life hack: cut the tortillas in half and line the flat edge up against the pan edge. What a delicious meal times about 9, since it’s so filling we ate off this pan for days.

I am guessing I picked up this copy of Cardinal Sins at AWP. So they are run by undergrads at Saginaw Valley State University. Says here they have been publishing for 30 years! Wow. The school must love them. I’ve been publishing SR for 7 years now (coming up on Issue 14) and we have wonderful support at ASU as well, and it’s so great to hear that other universities believe in supporting the arts this way.

So I’ll say first I didn’t recognize any of these contributors, which makes me wonder if they are also undergrads? I think they might be, since I’m looking at the contributors page and we have a lot of cheeky bios such as “X will be a thorn in your side,” and “X is surreal.” So. Yeah.

I enjoyed the large art section. Some compelling pieces such as Agoraphobia by Erin Case

What a fun read, Cardinal Sins. Thanks for all that you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Halibut, Corn, Tomatoes, Arugula and Post Road No. 14
This looks very similar to last week’s lunch and that’s because it’s summer in Phoenix and a body can only handle so much. So on Sundays we like to grill some fish, and I make my famous steamed corn-off-the-cob, and we throw whatever cold stuff we have on the plate and call it done. Today it’s a nice arugula salad and some tomatoes. So I’m eating leftovers from that meal. I don’t even heat it up because who needs more heat?
I picked up this copy of Post Road at AWP because I feel in love with the cover (reminds me of my favorite Wlico song). I loved this cover so much I found the artist Melinda Hackett and asked her to contribute work to SR and she said yes and I used her painting for the cover of our Issue 13. I would love to buy one of her paintings some day.
I did find the issue a bit challenging to read due to its format—the ads are interspersed throughout, unlike in most lit mags where they’re in the back. And the typeface is hard for me. Sorry old eyes.
I am surprised I have not heard of Mark Wisniewski before—I enjoyed his poem “Calculus.” I’ll have to look up some of his other work. I also enjoyed “The Karma Club” by Heather Hartley, especially the line, “his head a hurricane of baldness.”
What a lovely issue, Post Road. I can’t wait to read more!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Halibut, Corn, Tomatoes, Arugula and Post Road No. 14

This looks very similar to last week’s lunch and that’s because it’s summer in Phoenix and a body can only handle so much. So on Sundays we like to grill some fish, and I make my famous steamed corn-off-the-cob, and we throw whatever cold stuff we have on the plate and call it done. Today it’s a nice arugula salad and some tomatoes. So I’m eating leftovers from that meal. I don’t even heat it up because who needs more heat?

I picked up this copy of Post Road at AWP because I feel in love with the cover (reminds me of my favorite Wlico song). I loved this cover so much I found the artist Melinda Hackett and asked her to contribute work to SR and she said yes and I used her painting for the cover of our Issue 13. I would love to buy one of her paintings some day.

I did find the issue a bit challenging to read due to its format—the ads are interspersed throughout, unlike in most lit mags where they’re in the back. And the typeface is hard for me. Sorry old eyes.

I am surprised I have not heard of Mark Wisniewski before—I enjoyed his poem “Calculus.” I’ll have to look up some of his other work. I also enjoyed “The Karma Club” by Heather Hartley, especially the line, “his head a hurricane of baldness.”

What a lovely issue, Post Road. I can’t wait to read more!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Salmon, Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Corn and North American Review Spring 2014 Volume 299 Number 2
I’ve reviewed NAR before and I know I’ll review them again, but this is a special issue for me because it includes my poem “Rank Bitch,” which was a finalist for the James Hearst poetry prize. Thanks NAR! There’s even a sparkling ad for Superstition Review in this issue as well. It’s an all around win!
I always love the “From the Editors” notes and I usually start there. It’s interesting to read news from the masthead. I love that feature.
I’m a big Martha Silano fan, so I’m not mad that her poem “Ode to Frida Kahlo’s Eyebrows” beat mine. It’s a beautiful poem. I also enjoyed the second place poem by Mark Wagenaar. I recently read his book Vodoo Inverso so it was fun to read this newer piece.
I really appreciated the story by Lee Ann Roripaugh. I’m a big fan—we interviewed her for an early Issue of Superstition Review. Her story “Moist Towelette” is engaging and powerful.
Thanks so much for including my work and our ad, North American Review. I’m honored!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Salmon, Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Corn and North American Review Spring 2014 Volume 299 Number 2

I’ve reviewed NAR before and I know I’ll review them again, but this is a special issue for me because it includes my poem “Rank Bitch,” which was a finalist for the James Hearst poetry prize. Thanks NAR! There’s even a sparkling ad for Superstition Review in this issue as well. It’s an all around win!

I always love the “From the Editors” notes and I usually start there. It’s interesting to read news from the masthead. I love that feature.

I’m a big Martha Silano fan, so I’m not mad that her poem “Ode to Frida Kahlo’s Eyebrows” beat mine. It’s a beautiful poem. I also enjoyed the second place poem by Mark Wagenaar. I recently read his book Vodoo Inverso so it was fun to read this newer piece.

I really appreciated the story by Lee Ann Roripaugh. I’m a big fan—we interviewed her for an early Issue of Superstition Review. Her story “Moist Towelette” is engaging and powerful.

Thanks so much for including my work and our ad, North American Review. I’m honored!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Curry and Silk Road Number 11 Summer/Fall 2013
I make good curry. But it’s time consuming. And it takes ingredients I don’t always have on hand. So I have a trick. I like to order curry at one of our favorite local Thai restaurants. And then I pump it up by adding all sorts of vegetables. I also like to eat it over zucchini noodles instead of over rice, since that saves about 200 calories a lunch. At my age, every saved calorie helps.
This is my first lunch with Silk Road —I picked this copy up at AWP. Let’s look around here and see what we have! Okay the only contributor I recognize is Eleanor Lenore Bennett—we featured her photography in Issue 7, which was spring 2011.
I enjoyed the multicultural elements of Ken Turner’s work here. Also several lines in Janet McNally’s “Gretel has a Garden Now,” including, “Starvation is a kind of music.”
Great work with this lit mag, Silk Road. I enjoyed our lunch!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Curry and Silk Road Number 11 Summer/Fall 2013

I make good curry. But it’s time consuming. And it takes ingredients I don’t always have on hand. So I have a trick. I like to order curry at one of our favorite local Thai restaurants. And then I pump it up by adding all sorts of vegetables. I also like to eat it over zucchini noodles instead of over rice, since that saves about 200 calories a lunch. At my age, every saved calorie helps.

This is my first lunch with Silk Road —I picked this copy up at AWP. Let’s look around here and see what we have! Okay the only contributor I recognize is Eleanor Lenore Bennett—we featured her photography in Issue 7, which was spring 2011.

I enjoyed the multicultural elements of Ken Turner’s work here. Also several lines in Janet McNally’s “Gretel has a Garden Now,” including, “Starvation is a kind of music.”

Great work with this lit mag, Silk Road. I enjoyed our lunch!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Mushroom Ravioli and Philly Veg and Redivider 11.2
I call this Philly Veg because it’s the Veg I love on a Philly Cheesesteak (when I’m eating cheese and steak, which I try not to do.) So instead I whip up the Veg only and it satisfies my craving a little bit. Caramelized onions, green peppers, and mushroom. I can put it on just about anything, but these mushroom ravioli from Trader Joe’s are delicious and really easy to prepare. I got a new stove that has a “Turbo Boil” feature and I can finally get water boiling in under 3 minutes. (We don’t have gas in our neighborhood so it’s electric for me!)
Hard to believe I haven’t looked at Redivider since September 2013! I remember that issue really well, so that’s always a good start! The only name I recognize on this TOC is Ronda Broatch, which is kind of fun since I like her work plus I like reading new work. So let’s dig in and see what these folks have to offer.
I was charmed by Eric Baum’s piece “My Beard,” especially having just spent some time in Portland where everyone has this very beard. I loved the line “Things are changing and the reason is my beard.” How have I not heard of Marion Winik? I liked her piece “What if You Are Wrong” and I’m going to look up one of her seven books of creative nonfiction (wow!). I enjoyed the interview with her too.
So we’re liking couplets. Yes, I like them too. My favorite here is “Voyage to Goldilocks Planet” by Erin Hoover.
I like your style, Redivider. Keep on doing what you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Mushroom Ravioli and Philly Veg and Redivider 11.2

I call this Philly Veg because it’s the Veg I love on a Philly Cheesesteak (when I’m eating cheese and steak, which I try not to do.) So instead I whip up the Veg only and it satisfies my craving a little bit. Caramelized onions, green peppers, and mushroom. I can put it on just about anything, but these mushroom ravioli from Trader Joe’s are delicious and really easy to prepare. I got a new stove that has a “Turbo Boil” feature and I can finally get water boiling in under 3 minutes. (We don’t have gas in our neighborhood so it’s electric for me!)

Hard to believe I haven’t looked at Redivider since September 2013! I remember that issue really well, so that’s always a good start! The only name I recognize on this TOC is Ronda Broatch, which is kind of fun since I like her work plus I like reading new work. So let’s dig in and see what these folks have to offer.

I was charmed by Eric Baum’s piece “My Beard,” especially having just spent some time in Portland where everyone has this very beard. I loved the line “Things are changing and the reason is my beard.” How have I not heard of Marion Winik? I liked her piece “What if You Are Wrong” and I’m going to look up one of her seven books of creative nonfiction (wow!). I enjoyed the interview with her too.

So we’re liking couplets. Yes, I like them too. My favorite here is “Voyage to Goldilocks Planet” by Erin Hoover.

I like your style, Redivider. Keep on doing what you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.