Panang Curry and Burnside Review Volume 10 Number 1
You know all about my weakness for curry. See this picture? Yes that’s why. This comes from one of my favorite Thai restaurants, Thai Basil. I order the Panang with Tofu and eat it 4 times by adding lots more fresh veggies. See that asparagus? Delightful!
Something else delightful is this issue of Burnside Review! So I was walking the AWP Bookfair in Seattle when I passed the Burnside table. They had accepted one of my poems but it was recent so I had not imagined it was out yet. I picked up the current issue—love the unique shape and understated design—and noticed some great contributors—Kyle McCord, Ralph Angel, Mark Neely, Farrah Field. And then I saw my name too! How cool.
I really enjoyed reading this. Loved the Ralph Angel line, “When you were a fish/you were a salmon.” And Stephanie Ellis Schlaifer’s “We think ourselves a wall of water.”
Thanks so much for including my work, Burnside Review. I’m honored!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.

Panang Curry and Burnside Review Volume 10 Number 1

You know all about my weakness for curry. See this picture? Yes that’s why. This comes from one of my favorite Thai restaurants, Thai Basil. I order the Panang with Tofu and eat it 4 times by adding lots more fresh veggies. See that asparagus? Delightful!

Something else delightful is this issue of Burnside Review! So I was walking the AWP Bookfair in Seattle when I passed the Burnside table. They had accepted one of my poems but it was recent so I had not imagined it was out yet. I picked up the current issue—love the unique shape and understated design—and noticed some great contributors—Kyle McCord, Ralph Angel, Mark Neely, Farrah Field. And then I saw my name too! How cool.

I really enjoyed reading this. Loved the Ralph Angel line, “When you were a fish/you were a salmon.” And Stephanie Ellis Schlaifer’s “We think ourselves a wall of water.”

Thanks so much for including my work, Burnside Review. I’m honored!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

Enchilada Casserole and Cardinal Sins Fall 2013
I’ve made it before and I’ll make it again! We had a huge taco party at the house, and sure enough we had tons of leftovers: tortillas, beans, tomatoes, onions. That’s how we knew it was time for Enchilada casserole! I love building this out like a lasagna in a 9x11 pan. Life hack: cut the tortillas in half and line the flat edge up against the pan edge. What a delicious meal times about 9, since it’s so filling we ate off this pan for days.
I am guessing I picked up this copy of Cardinal Sins at AWP. So they are run by undergrads at Saginaw Valley State University. Says here they have been publishing for 30 years! Wow. The school must love them. I’ve been publishing SR for 7 years now (coming up on Issue 14) and we have wonderful support at ASU as well, and it’s so great to hear that other universities believe in supporting the arts this way.
So I’ll say first I didn’t recognize any of these contributors, which makes me wonder if they are also undergrads? I think they might be, since I’m looking at the contributors page and we have a lot of cheeky bios such as “X will be a thorn in your side,” and “X is surreal.” So. Yeah.
I enjoyed the large art section. Some compelling pieces such as Agoraphobia by Erin Case
What a fun read, Cardinal Sins. Thanks for all that you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Enchilada Casserole and Cardinal Sins Fall 2013

I’ve made it before and I’ll make it again! We had a huge taco party at the house, and sure enough we had tons of leftovers: tortillas, beans, tomatoes, onions. That’s how we knew it was time for Enchilada casserole! I love building this out like a lasagna in a 9x11 pan. Life hack: cut the tortillas in half and line the flat edge up against the pan edge. What a delicious meal times about 9, since it’s so filling we ate off this pan for days.

I am guessing I picked up this copy of Cardinal Sins at AWP. So they are run by undergrads at Saginaw Valley State University. Says here they have been publishing for 30 years! Wow. The school must love them. I’ve been publishing SR for 7 years now (coming up on Issue 14) and we have wonderful support at ASU as well, and it’s so great to hear that other universities believe in supporting the arts this way.

So I’ll say first I didn’t recognize any of these contributors, which makes me wonder if they are also undergrads? I think they might be, since I’m looking at the contributors page and we have a lot of cheeky bios such as “X will be a thorn in your side,” and “X is surreal.” So. Yeah.

I enjoyed the large art section. Some compelling pieces such as Agoraphobia by Erin Case

What a fun read, Cardinal Sins. Thanks for all that you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Halibut, Corn, Tomatoes, Arugula and Post Road No. 14
This looks very similar to last week’s lunch and that’s because it’s summer in Phoenix and a body can only handle so much. So on Sundays we like to grill some fish, and I make my famous steamed corn-off-the-cob, and we throw whatever cold stuff we have on the plate and call it done. Today it’s a nice arugula salad and some tomatoes. So I’m eating leftovers from that meal. I don’t even heat it up because who needs more heat?
I picked up this copy of Post Road at AWP because I feel in love with the cover (reminds me of my favorite Wlico song). I loved this cover so much I found the artist Melinda Hackett and asked her to contribute work to SR and she said yes and I used her painting for the cover of our Issue 13. I would love to buy one of her paintings some day.
I did find the issue a bit challenging to read due to its format—the ads are interspersed throughout, unlike in most lit mags where they’re in the back. And the typeface is hard for me. Sorry old eyes.
I am surprised I have not heard of Mark Wisniewski before—I enjoyed his poem “Calculus.” I’ll have to look up some of his other work. I also enjoyed “The Karma Club” by Heather Hartley, especially the line, “his head a hurricane of baldness.”
What a lovely issue, Post Road. I can’t wait to read more!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Halibut, Corn, Tomatoes, Arugula and Post Road No. 14

This looks very similar to last week’s lunch and that’s because it’s summer in Phoenix and a body can only handle so much. So on Sundays we like to grill some fish, and I make my famous steamed corn-off-the-cob, and we throw whatever cold stuff we have on the plate and call it done. Today it’s a nice arugula salad and some tomatoes. So I’m eating leftovers from that meal. I don’t even heat it up because who needs more heat?

I picked up this copy of Post Road at AWP because I feel in love with the cover (reminds me of my favorite Wlico song). I loved this cover so much I found the artist Melinda Hackett and asked her to contribute work to SR and she said yes and I used her painting for the cover of our Issue 13. I would love to buy one of her paintings some day.

I did find the issue a bit challenging to read due to its format—the ads are interspersed throughout, unlike in most lit mags where they’re in the back. And the typeface is hard for me. Sorry old eyes.

I am surprised I have not heard of Mark Wisniewski before—I enjoyed his poem “Calculus.” I’ll have to look up some of his other work. I also enjoyed “The Karma Club” by Heather Hartley, especially the line, “his head a hurricane of baldness.”

What a lovely issue, Post Road. I can’t wait to read more!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Salmon, Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Corn and North American Review Spring 2014 Volume 299 Number 2
I’ve reviewed NAR before and I know I’ll review them again, but this is a special issue for me because it includes my poem “Rank Bitch,” which was a finalist for the James Hearst poetry prize. Thanks NAR! There’s even a sparkling ad for Superstition Review in this issue as well. It’s an all around win!
I always love the “From the Editors” notes and I usually start there. It’s interesting to read news from the masthead. I love that feature.
I’m a big Martha Silano fan, so I’m not mad that her poem “Ode to Frida Kahlo’s Eyebrows” beat mine. It’s a beautiful poem. I also enjoyed the second place poem by Mark Wagenaar. I recently read his book Vodoo Inverso so it was fun to read this newer piece.
I really appreciated the story by Lee Ann Roripaugh. I’m a big fan—we interviewed her for an early Issue of Superstition Review.  Her story “Moist Towelette” is engaging and powerful.
Thanks so much for including my work and our ad, North American Review. I’m honored!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Salmon, Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Corn and North American Review Spring 2014 Volume 299 Number 2

I’ve reviewed NAR before and I know I’ll review them again, but this is a special issue for me because it includes my poem “Rank Bitch,” which was a finalist for the James Hearst poetry prize. Thanks NAR! There’s even a sparkling ad for Superstition Review in this issue as well. It’s an all around win!

I always love the “From the Editors” notes and I usually start there. It’s interesting to read news from the masthead. I love that feature.

I’m a big Martha Silano fan, so I’m not mad that her poem “Ode to Frida Kahlo’s Eyebrows” beat mine. It’s a beautiful poem. I also enjoyed the second place poem by Mark Wagenaar. I recently read his book Vodoo Inverso so it was fun to read this newer piece.

I really appreciated the story by Lee Ann Roripaugh. I’m a big fan—we interviewed her for an early Issue of Superstition Review. Her story “Moist Towelette” is engaging and powerful.

Thanks so much for including my work and our ad, North American Review. I’m honored!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Curry and Silk Road Number 11 Summer/Fall 2013
I make good curry. But it’s time consuming. And it takes ingredients I don’t always have on hand. So I have a trick. I like to order curry at one of our favorite local Thai restaurants. And then I pump it up by adding all sorts of vegetables. I also like to eat it over zucchini noodles instead of over rice, since that saves about 200 calories a lunch. At my age, every saved calorie helps.
This is my first lunch with Silk Road —I picked this copy up at AWP. Let’s look around here and see what we have! Okay the only contributor I recognize is Eleanor Lenore Bennett—we featured her photography in Issue 7, which was spring 2011.
I enjoyed the multicultural elements of Ken Turner’s work here. Also several lines in Janet McNally’s “Gretel has a Garden Now,” including, “Starvation is a kind of music.”
Great work with this lit mag, Silk Road. I enjoyed our lunch!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Curry and Silk Road Number 11 Summer/Fall 2013

I make good curry. But it’s time consuming. And it takes ingredients I don’t always have on hand. So I have a trick. I like to order curry at one of our favorite local Thai restaurants. And then I pump it up by adding all sorts of vegetables. I also like to eat it over zucchini noodles instead of over rice, since that saves about 200 calories a lunch. At my age, every saved calorie helps.

This is my first lunch with Silk Road —I picked this copy up at AWP. Let’s look around here and see what we have! Okay the only contributor I recognize is Eleanor Lenore Bennett—we featured her photography in Issue 7, which was spring 2011.

I enjoyed the multicultural elements of Ken Turner’s work here. Also several lines in Janet McNally’s “Gretel has a Garden Now,” including, “Starvation is a kind of music.”

Great work with this lit mag, Silk Road. I enjoyed our lunch!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Mushroom Ravioli and Philly Veg and Redivider 11.2
I call this Philly Veg because it’s the Veg I love on a Philly Cheesesteak (when I’m eating cheese and steak, which I try not to do.) So instead I whip up the Veg only and it satisfies my craving a little bit. Caramelized onions, green peppers, and mushroom. I can put it on just about anything, but these mushroom ravioli from Trader Joe’s are delicious and really easy to prepare. I got a new stove that has a “Turbo Boil” feature and I can finally get water boiling in under 3 minutes. (We don’t have gas in our neighborhood so it’s electric for me!)
Hard to believe I haven’t looked at Redivider since September 2013! I remember that issue really well, so that’s always a good start! The only name I recognize on this TC is Ronda Broatch, which is kind of fun since I like her work plus I like reading new work. So let’s dig in and see what these folks have to offer.
I was charmed by Eric Baum’s piece “My Beard,” especially having just spent some time in Portland where everyone has this very beard. I loved the line “Things are changing and the reason is my beard.” 

How have I not heard of Marion Winik? I liked her piece “What if You Are Wrong” and I’m going to look up one of her seven books of creative nonfiction (wow!). I enjoyed the interview with her too.

So we’re liking couplets. Yes, I like them too. My favorite here is “Voyage to Goldilocks Planet” by Erin Hoover.
I like your style, Redivider. Keep on doing what you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Mushroom Ravioli and Philly Veg and Redivider 11.2

I call this Philly Veg because it’s the Veg I love on a Philly Cheesesteak (when I’m eating cheese and steak, which I try not to do.) So instead I whip up the Veg only and it satisfies my craving a little bit. Caramelized onions, green peppers, and mushroom. I can put it on just about anything, but these mushroom ravioli from Trader Joe’s are delicious and really easy to prepare. I got a new stove that has a “Turbo Boil” feature and I can finally get water boiling in under 3 minutes. (We don’t have gas in our neighborhood so it’s electric for me!)

Hard to believe I haven’t looked at Redivider since September 2013! I remember that issue really well, so that’s always a good start! The only name I recognize on this TC is Ronda Broatch, which is kind of fun since I like her work plus I like reading new work. So let’s dig in and see what these folks have to offer.

I was charmed by Eric Baum’s piece “My Beard,” especially having just spent some time in Portland where everyone has this very beard. I loved the line “Things are changing and the reason is my beard.” How have I not heard of Marion Winik? I liked her piece “What if You Are Wrong” and I’m going to look up one of her seven books of creative nonfiction (wow!). I enjoyed the interview with her too.

So we’re liking couplets. Yes, I like them too. My favorite here is “Voyage to Goldilocks Planet” by Erin Hoover.

I like your style, Redivider. Keep on doing what you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Mediterranean Chicken Salad and Superstition Review Issue 13
This is that leftover salad from Pita Jungle that I’ve told you about before—it’s so big I can order it once and eat 4 times. That’s a little crazy! But it’s super delicious. It has: Cubed grilled chicken tossed with diced tomatoes, onions, roasted bell peppers, pine nuts, cucumbers, corn, golden raisins and taboule, over a bed of mixed greens with feta and lemon vinaigrette.
I could not be more proud to release our 13th issue of Superstition Review. What a journey this has been! 6.5 years of publishing great Art, Fiction, Interviews, Nonfiction, and Poetry. I really enjoyed working with my student interns and faculty advisors, and of course all 60 of our contributors. I’m always so happy when we create this beautiful thing in only 15 weeks.
I want to make just a few comments about this issue. I’ve said before that my main goal with this magazine is to be a “literary ambassador.” I love that term, and I love that life, and I especially enjoy passing on that value to students. To that end, here is what we’ve done this semester: 1. We have published 60 artists/authors we admire in a beautiful format that is free. 2. We have shared literary news and ideas (and job ads!) across our social networks. 3. We have encouraged our community to subscribe to and read other literary magazines. 4. We have attended literary events in our town and at AWP in Seattle. 5. We have given back to our community in ways that enhance literacy and the arts. This year we did that three ways: a collaboration with the Creative Writing class at Combs High School, volunteering with Free Arts Arizona, and volunteering with UMOM’s Read to Me Program.
Now it’s time for our summer hiatus, though I can barely wait to get back at it again in September.
You should really check out our website.
And like them us Facebook.
And follow them us Twitter.

Mediterranean Chicken Salad and Superstition Review Issue 13

This is that leftover salad from Pita Jungle that I’ve told you about before—it’s so big I can order it once and eat 4 times. That’s a little crazy! But it’s super delicious. It has: Cubed grilled chicken tossed with diced tomatoes, onions, roasted bell peppers, pine nuts, cucumbers, corn, golden raisins and taboule, over a bed of mixed greens with feta and lemon vinaigrette.

I could not be more proud to release our 13th issue of Superstition Review. What a journey this has been! 6.5 years of publishing great Art, Fiction, Interviews, Nonfiction, and Poetry. I really enjoyed working with my student interns and faculty advisors, and of course all 60 of our contributors. I’m always so happy when we create this beautiful thing in only 15 weeks.

I want to make just a few comments about this issue. I’ve said before that my main goal with this magazine is to be a “literary ambassador.” I love that term, and I love that life, and I especially enjoy passing on that value to students. To that end, here is what we’ve done this semester: 1. We have published 60 artists/authors we admire in a beautiful format that is free. 2. We have shared literary news and ideas (and job ads!) across our social networks. 3. We have encouraged our community to subscribe to and read other literary magazines. 4. We have attended literary events in our town and at AWP in Seattle. 5. We have given back to our community in ways that enhance literacy and the arts. This year we did that three ways: a collaboration with the Creative Writing class at Combs High School, volunteering with Free Arts Arizona, and volunteering with UMOM’s Read to Me Program.

Now it’s time for our summer hiatus, though I can barely wait to get back at it again in September.

You should really check out our website.

And like them us Facebook.

And follow them us Twitter.

AWP Breakfast and North American Review Volume 299 Number 1
You’ve seen this lunch before and you’ll see it again. I call this lunch AWP Breakfast because this is what I love to eat each day at AWP before I head off to talk with authors for 16 hours straight. It includes toast, eggs, and fruit. So easy and so yum.
I reviewed North American Review last November, and I’ll be reviewing them again soon too since I have one more issue in the queue. So I won’t say too much about the mag itself, other than Wow! You do a good job and Wow! you’ve been around forever.
I really enjoyed the inventiveness of Kay Cosgrove’s “Accent” and the musicality of Alison Swan’s “Lifeboat.” I think my favorite poem of the bunch is “Rio Manzanares” by Curtis Bauer: “Houses have roofs so frail you pray no moonlight falls on them.” I also always enjoy reading the book reviews.
I really enjoyed it, North American Review. Keep up the great work!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

AWP Breakfast and North American Review Volume 299 Number 1

You’ve seen this lunch before and you’ll see it again. I call this lunch AWP Breakfast because this is what I love to eat each day at AWP before I head off to talk with authors for 16 hours straight. It includes toast, eggs, and fruit. So easy and so yum.

I reviewed North American Review last November, and I’ll be reviewing them again soon too since I have one more issue in the queue. So I won’t say too much about the mag itself, other than Wow! You do a good job and Wow! you’ve been around forever.

I really enjoyed the inventiveness of Kay Cosgrove’s “Accent” and the musicality of Alison Swan’s “Lifeboat.” I think my favorite poem of the bunch is “Rio Manzanares” by Curtis Bauer: “Houses have roofs so frail you pray no moonlight falls on them.” I also always enjoy reading the book reviews.

I really enjoyed it, North American Review. Keep up the great work!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Ciabatta and Swiss and Tomato Sammie and Quarter After Eight Volume 20
I ain’t even gonna front. I heart swiss cheese! So much. So this lovely lunch is a little irresistible to me. Trader Joe’s has these great par-baked Ciabatta rolls. Slap on a slice of swiss. Grab a ‘mater from the garden, and your sammie is good to go.
And how perfectly does this lunch match this adorable cover of Quarter After Eight with artwork by Carrie Moss? I really like her work. When I got this issue in the mail I just got such joy from this whimsical design. I’m reading back to front. The editors did Superstition Review a solid by featuring our ad in the back. Thanks for the exchange! And since I’m back there I want to ask a question. How do you feel about character/word limits on bios? I recently published work in a mag that demanded 100 characters only. At SR I’m super strict about 100 words because otherwise the formatting goes wonky. I’m just noticing here that some bios are two sentences and there is one bio that is six very long sentences and let’s just say that after reading it I feel like I could describe the author’s belly button lint. Just an observation.
I am going to hop right into the nonfiction section here, because I want to read the essay by Gary L. McDowell. I published 4 of his poems last fall and it was one of those submissions where I’m reading, reading, reading—maybe I’ve been a NO to 25 or so subs, then I read Gary’s and I’m all “Yes, yes yes!” I really love his poems. Will I like his essay? Yes. I like it too. Some of the same skill exhibited here as in the poems—imagery, refrain, reflection. “If dreams can be read, who would ever wish to be literate?”
Lots of other great work here—I love the “Conversations” sections.
Thanks for the ad exchange, Quarter After Eight. We hope to work with you again!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Ciabatta and Swiss and Tomato Sammie and Quarter After Eight Volume 20

I ain’t even gonna front. I heart swiss cheese! So much. So this lovely lunch is a little irresistible to me. Trader Joe’s has these great par-baked Ciabatta rolls. Slap on a slice of swiss. Grab a ‘mater from the garden, and your sammie is good to go.

And how perfectly does this lunch match this adorable cover of Quarter After Eight with artwork by Carrie Moss? I really like her work. When I got this issue in the mail I just got such joy from this whimsical design. I’m reading back to front. The editors did Superstition Review a solid by featuring our ad in the back. Thanks for the exchange! And since I’m back there I want to ask a question. How do you feel about character/word limits on bios? I recently published work in a mag that demanded 100 characters only. At SR I’m super strict about 100 words because otherwise the formatting goes wonky. I’m just noticing here that some bios are two sentences and there is one bio that is six very long sentences and let’s just say that after reading it I feel like I could describe the author’s belly button lint. Just an observation.

I am going to hop right into the nonfiction section here, because I want to read the essay by Gary L. McDowell. I published 4 of his poems last fall and it was one of those submissions where I’m reading, reading, reading—maybe I’ve been a NO to 25 or so subs, then I read Gary’s and I’m all “Yes, yes yes!” I really love his poems. Will I like his essay? Yes. I like it too. Some of the same skill exhibited here as in the poems—imagery, refrain, reflection. “If dreams can be read, who would ever wish to be literate?”

Lots of other great work here—I love the “Conversations” sections.

Thanks for the ad exchange, Quarter After Eight. We hope to work with you again!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Tacos and Puerto del Sol 48.1
No one ever got mad at a taco. This lunch represents my very favorite kind. Roasted corn on top, fresh tomatoes and avocados. It’s a super simple and easy and delicious lunch.
I’m especially interested in this issue of Puerto del Sol because we featured an interview of Editor-in-Chief Garmen Gimenez Smith in Issue 13 of Superstition Review. What a fascinating advisory board here too—Jenny Boully and Kyle Minor. Lee K. Abbott and Rebecca Wolff. I’m especially interested to dig in and see what this issue has to offer. Is it old fashioned of me to wish that we got a distinction between fiction and nonfiction? Listing it all as “prose” leaves me guessing, even though I know Matt Bell’s excerpt is fiction. Still.
I really enjoyed the work of Robin Lee Jordan and the use of imagery and anaphora. I also liked the conceit in Noah Eli Gordon’s “Did You Drop This Word.” I’m a big fan of Sally Wen Mao, so I was happy to read her “Antipode Essay,” especially the line “How democratic the stars were that night.”
I’m also glad to read the book reviews. Those are not always easy to curate, and I admire those lit mags that do them.
Great work with this lit mag, Puerto del Sol. I enjoyed our lunch!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.

Tacos and Puerto del Sol 48.1

No one ever got mad at a taco. This lunch represents my very favorite kind. Roasted corn on top, fresh tomatoes and avocados. It’s a super simple and easy and delicious lunch.

I’m especially interested in this issue of Puerto del Sol because we featured an interview of Editor-in-Chief Garmen Gimenez Smith in Issue 13 of Superstition Review. What a fascinating advisory board here too—Jenny Boully and Kyle Minor. Lee K. Abbott and Rebecca Wolff. I’m especially interested to dig in and see what this issue has to offer. Is it old fashioned of me to wish that we got a distinction between fiction and nonfiction? Listing it all as “prose” leaves me guessing, even though I know Matt Bell’s excerpt is fiction. Still.

I really enjoyed the work of Robin Lee Jordan and the use of imagery and anaphora. I also liked the conceit in Noah Eli Gordon’s “Did You Drop This Word.” I’m a big fan of Sally Wen Mao, so I was happy to read her “Antipode Essay,” especially the line “How democratic the stars were that night.”

I’m also glad to read the book reviews. Those are not always easy to curate, and I admire those lit mags that do them.

Great work with this lit mag, Puerto del Sol. I enjoyed our lunch!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

Fruit, Eggs, Toast and Tampa Review 47/48
I’m back to doing a hard 6-week push to finish a project so the meals are going to get a little predictable here. This is a go-to because it’s so tasty and it’s not only easy to make it’s really easy to shop for.
I’m happy to read this issue of Tampa Review and to be honest I had several others in the queue ahead of it, but when it arrived in the mail, well, look at it! Wouldn’t you want to read it right away? I love the cover art (my Art Advisor might call this a “Trish” cover since it’s the type of abstract colorful painting I’m always drawn towards). It’s also so cool that this is a volume-sized hardback magazine. I’m so thrilled to dig in!
What an amazing idea to feature art by the University of Tampa art faculty. Oh my gosh I might have to steal that idea and do an issue with work by ASU artists. This is what I would call an “epic” issue (someone used that term once for an issue of SR and it seems to apply here too). With 9 stories, 7 essays, and work by 36 poets and 10 artists, we’re talking 62 contributors! I feature 60 per issue, and I can tell you that’s a lot of wrangling.
I’m happy to see some familiar names here so I gravitate straight towards that work: Benjamin S. Grossberg, Sara Schaff, Matthew Lippman, Heather Foster, and Matthew Gavin Frank are all people who have contributed to SR so it’s fun to see them here in a reunion of sorts. I really loved a lot of the work here—Sarah Crossland’s “In the Breath of Ten Thousand Metals,” especially the line “Listen, our teeth have found a way out.” I also really enjoyed Martha Grace Duncan’s “My Father and the Hair Grafter.”
What a fun read, Tampa Review. Thanks for all that you do!
You should really check out their website.
And follow them on Twitter.

Fruit, Eggs, Toast and Tampa Review 47/48

I’m back to doing a hard 6-week push to finish a project so the meals are going to get a little predictable here. This is a go-to because it’s so tasty and it’s not only easy to make it’s really easy to shop for.

I’m happy to read this issue of Tampa Review and to be honest I had several others in the queue ahead of it, but when it arrived in the mail, well, look at it! Wouldn’t you want to read it right away? I love the cover art (my Art Advisor might call this a “Trish” cover since it’s the type of abstract colorful painting I’m always drawn towards). It’s also so cool that this is a volume-sized hardback magazine. I’m so thrilled to dig in!

What an amazing idea to feature art by the University of Tampa art faculty. Oh my gosh I might have to steal that idea and do an issue with work by ASU artists. This is what I would call an “epic” issue (someone used that term once for an issue of SR and it seems to apply here too). With 9 stories, 7 essays, and work by 36 poets and 10 artists, we’re talking 62 contributors! I feature 60 per issue, and I can tell you that’s a lot of wrangling.

I’m happy to see some familiar names here so I gravitate straight towards that work: Benjamin S. Grossberg, Sara Schaff, Matthew Lippman, Heather Foster, and Matthew Gavin Frank are all people who have contributed to SR so it’s fun to see them here in a reunion of sorts. I really loved a lot of the work here—Sarah Crossland’s “In the Breath of Ten Thousand Metals,” especially the line “Listen, our teeth have found a way out.” I also really enjoyed Martha Grace Duncan’s “My Father and the Hair Grafter.”

What a fun read, Tampa Review. Thanks for all that you do!

You should really check out their website.

And follow them on Twitter.

Curry and Boulevard No. 87
Here’s 10 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. Success! And how lovely to end with what I admit is my absolute favorite. I do make my own curry all the time and it is delicious. But this was left over from a dinner at one of my favorite Thai restaurants, Yupha’s.
I’m happy to read this issue of Boulevard and I’m impressed with their list of blurbs. That is a lot of high praise for the magazine. It’s not easy to earn such a good reputation—there are a lot of wonderful lit mags these days so to be named in the top 6-8 by good readers is a true achievement
I enjoyed the poem “Instructions for Becoming an Attraction” by Carrie Shipers. Interesting “how-to” poem. I’m a big Floyd Skloot fan, and here his essay “To Land’s End and Back” does not disappoint. I teach Travel Writing, and this is just the kind of essay I like to use as a model for my students. I’ve read Anis Shivani’s prose before but never his poetry, so I was delighted by the poem “Dictator,” especially the line “He said to fishes out of season, food is love.”
Great work with this lit mag, Boulevard. I enjoyed our lunch!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Curry and Boulevard No. 87

Here’s 10 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. Success! And how lovely to end with what I admit is my absolute favorite. I do make my own curry all the time and it is delicious. But this was left over from a dinner at one of my favorite Thai restaurants, Yupha’s.

I’m happy to read this issue of Boulevard and I’m impressed with their list of blurbs. That is a lot of high praise for the magazine. It’s not easy to earn such a good reputation—there are a lot of wonderful lit mags these days so to be named in the top 6-8 by good readers is a true achievement

I enjoyed the poem “Instructions for Becoming an Attraction” by Carrie Shipers. Interesting “how-to” poem. I’m a big Floyd Skloot fan, and here his essay “To Land’s End and Back” does not disappoint. I teach Travel Writing, and this is just the kind of essay I like to use as a model for my students. I’ve read Anis Shivani’s prose before but never his poetry, so I was delighted by the poem “Dictator,” especially the line “He said to fishes out of season, food is love.”

Great work with this lit mag, Boulevard. I enjoyed our lunch!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Zucchini Pasta and Washington Square Winter/Spring 2014
Here’s 9 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. Let me first admit I love pasta. But pasta doesn’t always love me. Enter the leave-it-to-the-Germans invention The Spiralschneider. What a great contraption! It allows me to make wonderful guilt-free pasta out of zucchini, which tastes just like al dente linguine. Plus it’s so fun to use. I would call this a win-win.
I’m digging the color of this cover of Washington Square and of course I love their clever abbreviation “on squ,” which is also their Twitter handle. I think it’s neat that they start the issue with an epigraph from one of the poets. That’s a smart idea and a great touch.
I enjoyed Andrea Cohen’s poems, especially the line “I’m not worth the paper I’m lifted from.” And wow—Joe Meno’s piece, “Animal Hospital.” What beautiful cadence, and also a creative and thoughtful representation of domestic life.
And these brilliant lines by Carl Phillips: “You are the knife,/ and you are also what the knife/ has opened, says the wind.” Reminds me a little of one of my favorite lines from Franz Wright: “The knife giving the wound/ some free advice.”
I like your style, Washington Square. Keep on doing what you do!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Zucchini Pasta and Washington Square Winter/Spring 2014

Here’s 9 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. Let me first admit I love pasta. But pasta doesn’t always love me. Enter the leave-it-to-the-Germans invention The Spiralschneider. What a great contraption! It allows me to make wonderful guilt-free pasta out of zucchini, which tastes just like al dente linguine. Plus it’s so fun to use. I would call this a win-win.

I’m digging the color of this cover of Washington Square and of course I love their clever abbreviation “on squ,” which is also their Twitter handle. I think it’s neat that they start the issue with an epigraph from one of the poets. That’s a smart idea and a great touch.

I enjoyed Andrea Cohen’s poems, especially the line “I’m not worth the paper I’m lifted from.” And wow—Joe Meno’s piece, “Animal Hospital.” What beautiful cadence, and also a creative and thoughtful representation of domestic life.

And these brilliant lines by Carl Phillips: “You are the knife,/ and you are also what the knife/ has opened, says the wind.” Reminds me a little of one of my favorite lines from Franz Wright: “The knife giving the wound/ some free advice.”

I like your style, Washington Square. Keep on doing what you do!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Nachos and Boston Review May/June 2014
Here’s 8 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. Granted, this is just about the same meal as Tacos and Bean Bowl (which you already saw in the rotation) except I pile the goodies on top of some tortilla chips. Some may not consider it a real distinction from the others, but it is enough of a change-up where I don’t feel like I’m eating the same thing every day. Plus it’s so yum!
So I just reviewed Boston Review back in November, but this new issue came in the mail and ended up on top of the list. So I’m reading it with lunch today. I was interested in the article “Is Get Out the Vote Bad for Democracy,” especially the question, “What if GOTV methods primarily mobilize citizens who are already well represented and fail to nudge the rest?” Great special section, too, on “Saving Privacy.” I saw a documentary recently about data aggregation companies and the mass amounts of raw information they are collecting, especially simply from location features on cellular phones. I don’t have panic about this yet, but this section helped me to understand more about why I might be wise to overract to that in the future. It was great to hear so many voices on the topic.
It’s great to read poems here too by GC Waldrep “The voice running/into the corn-//field, into the/cyst of the corn.” and Dara Wier “O coat in my closet that is not mine.” And Arthur Vogelsang, “There are an unexpected number of seashells in everybody’s house.”
I really enjoyed it, Boston Review. Keep up the great work!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Nachos and Boston Review May/June 2014

Here’s 8 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. Granted, this is just about the same meal as Tacos and Bean Bowl (which you already saw in the rotation) except I pile the goodies on top of some tortilla chips. Some may not consider it a real distinction from the others, but it is enough of a change-up where I don’t feel like I’m eating the same thing every day. Plus it’s so yum!

So I just reviewed Boston Review back in November, but this new issue came in the mail and ended up on top of the list. So I’m reading it with lunch today. I was interested in the article “Is Get Out the Vote Bad for Democracy,” especially the question, “What if GOTV methods primarily mobilize citizens who are already well represented and fail to nudge the rest?” Great special section, too, on “Saving Privacy.” I saw a documentary recently about data aggregation companies and the mass amounts of raw information they are collecting, especially simply from location features on cellular phones. I don’t have panic about this yet, but this section helped me to understand more about why I might be wise to overract to that in the future. It was great to hear so many voices on the topic.

It’s great to read poems here too by GC Waldrep “The voice running/into the corn-//field, into the/cyst of the corn.” and Dara Wier “O coat in my closet that is not mine.” And Arthur Vogelsang, “There are an unexpected number of seashells in everybody’s house.”

I really enjoyed it, Boston Review. Keep up the great work!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.

Lettuce Wraps and Creative Nonfiction Issue 51 Spring 2014
Here’s 7 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. This is truly one of my favorite meals—and so easy. I prefer to use collards for the wrap, but today I only had romaine so that’s what you see. Four leaves stuffed full with tomato, onion, black olive, avocado, and because I was craving it—yellow mustard! I highly recommend these wraps when you’re hungry and short on time.
So Lee Gutkind, Editor of Creative Nonfiction, is a colleague at ASU. I recently went to visit him in his office, where we talked a bit about CNF and some of its programs. It’s a great service they provide, and I’m happy it’s so well funded. And this issue on Sustainability is perfectly timed with the recent reports of irreversible melting of Antarctic Glaciers.
I was happy to read all of the essays here, but especially the work of Nicole Walker, who works just up the road at Northern Arizona University. Her piece “Regeneration” was a compelling experiment with form—I really enjoyed the way it pulsed back to the 3 main points of the essay.
Great work with this lit mag, Creative Nonfiction. I enjoyed our lunch!
You should really check out their website.
And like them on Facebook.
And follow them on Twitter.

Lettuce Wraps and Creative Nonfiction Issue 51 Spring 2014

Here’s 7 of 10 vegan lunches in a row. This is truly one of my favorite meals—and so easy. I prefer to use collards for the wrap, but today I only had romaine so that’s what you see. Four leaves stuffed full with tomato, onion, black olive, avocado, and because I was craving it—yellow mustard! I highly recommend these wraps when you’re hungry and short on time.

So Lee Gutkind, Editor of Creative Nonfiction, is a colleague at ASU. I recently went to visit him in his office, where we talked a bit about CNF and some of its programs. It’s a great service they provide, and I’m happy it’s so well funded. And this issue on Sustainability is perfectly timed with the recent reports of irreversible melting of Antarctic Glaciers.

I was happy to read all of the essays here, but especially the work of Nicole Walker, who works just up the road at Northern Arizona University. Her piece “Regeneration” was a compelling experiment with form—I really enjoyed the way it pulsed back to the 3 main points of the essay.

Great work with this lit mag, Creative Nonfiction. I enjoyed our lunch!

You should really check out their website.

And like them on Facebook.

And follow them on Twitter.